Lamp Room

Lamp Room

Here in the Lamp Room you will find links and articles to a wealth of information on the use , development and maintenance of your Protector Lamp. You will find links to articles on Protector Lamp’s history and about Protector’s range of lamps and their development.

The Lamp Room is the home of miners lamps and is a crucial part of every colliery, lamps have been stored and maintained here since the days of the Davy Lamp. All miners pass through here on their way to the shaft to collect their mining cap lamps and their flame safety lamps, and when the shift is over they return through the Lamp Room to drop off their safety equipment before going to the baths.

Protector Lamp how to videos

Protector Lamp Types List

Miners lamp buying guide

History

About

The Protector Lamp & Lighting Company is best known as a producer of miners’ safety lamps.The safety lamp is essentially a highly sophisticated form of oil or spirit lamp of extremely robust construction. The Company was formed in May 1873 to acquire the business and patent rights of William Edward Teale, oil and lamp manufacturer, of 11 Mark Lane, Manchester. The Company’s Memorandum of Association mentions two patents which had been obtained by Mr Teale: one dated 15th November 1869 for ‘Improvements in Mining Lamps’ and the other dated 4th December 1872 for ‘Improvements in Guards for Gas Lights, and in an improved method of Lighting while under the protection of Guards’.

Miners Lamp Fuel

Most round wick lamps use Colzalene/ Relighter Spirit. All spark ignition lamps use this type of fuel as does our SL Lamp. As this is no longer readily available we recommend Colemans Camping Stove Fuel, available at Amazon, Go Outdoors and most camping shops or you can use Ronson or Zippo lighter fuel.

Do not use paraffin, kerosene or lamp oil in spark ignition lamps as it will not light with a spark.

It is generally flat wick lamps such as our 1A Lamp which burn paraffin/kerosene or lamp oil. These are usually lamps which can be lit with a naked flame.
The Olympic Torch Relay lamps burn paraffin or kerosene.

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